Sale of wine only through liquor stores in Maharashtra

Sale of wine only through liquor stores in Maharashtra

Why the sale of wine on liquor stores or supermarkets only?

Maharashtra is the state with the highest number of alcohol-related accidents. Wine is considered as a major cause of accidents in the state. The government has recently come up with a new policy to do away with wine sales in liquor stores. According to reports, 65 percent units of the wine industry in the country. A senior excise department official said the new policy has come as the present wine policy, which allows sale of wine only through exclusive liquor stores.

Wine Industry Grows

According to reports, 65 percent units of the wine industry in the country. A senior excise department official said the new policy has come as the present wine policy, which allows sale of wine only through exclusive liquor stores.

Wine is sold through liquor stores only

Maharashtra health department is considering a proposal to allow sale of wine in liquor stores, which will lower the prices. Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis has also favoured such a move to curb rising prices of wine.

Sale of wine through liquor stores, which allows consumers to buy wine at cheap prices, is only for Maharashtra. The idea was first mooted by the state government and the National Green Tribunal (NGT) had set guidelines for it in 2012.

The state prohibits sale of alcohol except through liquor shops and bars in all cities, except Mumbai where it is allowed except in select areas like Bhendi Bazaar and Colaba. In Mumbai, only one shop sells wine; another sells beer.

The new proposal by the Maharashtra government would permit sales of wine at liquor shops around the state “in places like Mumbai where there are no private bars or shops selling alcohol”.

Similar to those anti-alcohol groups that have been lobbying hard against alcohol sales through liquor stores or pubs, they are attempting to prevent patrons from buying expensive wines and spirits.

Video for full details on Wine Shope New Policy in Maharastra

What is the New Wine Policy?

In a bid to boost sales, the state government has decided to ban sale of wine through liquor stores. Under the new policy, wines can only be sold at exclusive liquor stores serving alcohol, States News and Analysis reported.

The move comes after the state government decided not to approve the proposed amendment in The Maharashtra Prohibition Act, which seeks to allow sale of wine and non-alcoholic beverages at liquor shops.

In March last year, Maharashtra had cleared the amendment in The Prohibition Act that would have allowed sale of wine and non-alcoholic beverages at liquor shops across the state. But as per reports, a majority of revenue department officials were against this proposal.

Some industry stakeholders said it is a good step for many reasons: for one, it will help prevent illegal sale of alcohol which has been a concern for years; secondly, it will help protect wine from being consumed by minors which has been a concern since time immemorial; thirdly, it will ensure that there is only one place where wine can be bought; finally, it will encourage people who are unable to purchase alcohol due to various reasons such as disability or illness.

A senior excise department official said that the government is looking into ways to increase sales of wine in that particular segment. “As per statistics available with us on total sales across different segments like bars/clubs and restaurants etc we have seen that there is an increase in sales from Rs 5 crore in 2014-15 under liquor shop categories (for which total sales data was available) to Rs 6 crore in 2015-16,” he said. “In addition if we look at total number (of units) sold across all segments over last two years then there was an increase from 11 lakh units in 2012-13 to 21 lakh units in 2013-14.”

He added: “But we don’t want people selling through liquor shops all over the state just because they are able enough to buy alcohol.” “We want people buying alcohol only from exclusive liquor store or through licensed distributors or through licensed wholesalers.” On whether this policy will affect interstate trade between states/nations if they have restrictions on purchase of products made elsewhere by states/nations – this officer said no due to restrictions on purchasing products made elsewhere by states/nations.”

Many wine producers and winemakers, on the other hand, disagree with this idea

The move by the Maharashtra government to make it mandatory for wine producers to sell their products through liquor stores was met with resistance from wine makers and winemakers in the state.

The move, which was expected to be implemented across the state by June 2018, has been delayed till next year owing to opposition from most of the winemakers in the state.

Overall Conclusion

The government has not yet come out with the new wine policy guidelines. However, it is expected to be effective from July 1, 2016. The decision was taken at the cabinet meeting held yesterday in Nagpur. The move could have a significant impact on the wine industry as well as on the state’s economy.

As we have seen in our discussion of virtual reality, most people will buy another product if they do not like what they have already bought, and will not buy anything else unless it changes their opinion about that product or app. If a product does not conform to its user interface, do-not-buy rule, or any other set of rules that are imposed by its maker, most people will simply ignore it and try something else instead.

Here’s a great example: “The company has decided that all its sales representatives should be required to speak English fluently”; “The company has decided that employees should never speak Hindi”; “The company has decided that employees should speak only English fluently”.

“The company has decided that employees should never speak Hindi or any other language except English” or any other similar kinds of beliefs spread around the organization using this kind of ‘do-what-I-do’ approach.

“We want our people to speak English at all times.” “Every employee must speak English.” “Employees must speak English only.” “Employees must speak English at all times.” “All employees must speak English fluently.” “All employees must learn English fluently.” “All employees must learn Hindi fluently.”

This kind of mindset is quite common within companies where managers impose strict.

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